Sunday, March 16, 2008

The logica of some Turkish journalists

I know that Turkish people want to read nice stories. But this is not a nice one.
After the action of the Turkish Chief prosecutor to ban the ruling AKP party, some Turkish journalists are defending this – by attacking the EU for double standards – that Europe had a history of banning parties. The truth is something else. First you cannot say the EU, still confusing this with Europe. And second, the countries in the EU don’t have a history of banning political parties. Only the KPD in 1956, in West Germany was banned.


It is extremely difficult to ban political parties in Europe, and attempts to shut down parties are regarded as incompatible with liberal democracies. When political parties appealed to Germany's Supreme Court to ban the Nazi Party, their request was turned down on grounds that the allegations were not sufficiently sound. A similar move in Belgium to ban the openly racist Vlaams Belang (The Benefit of the Flemish People) Party was rejected by the country's highest court.
Batasuna in Spain can still act, on personal note, openly, and is not illegal in France.
We can discuss which parties were considered illegal in Franco’s Spain, under the Greek Junta, or under the torn of the Soviet Union in Central and East Europe.
It’s now about parties in countries which are member or wannabee members of the EU. Countries which are members of the NATO, the OESO. Nothing else counts at the moment.
And Turkey has a record of closing down parties: 24 in the last 44 years. For some of you: even during the Cold War, the communist parties were allowed and even represented in several governments (Italy).

5 comments:

Dimitris said...

Excuses, always excuses.
Islamist brings nobody somewhere neither the Kemalist.
A dark time for Turkey, it can still not get rid of its past.

Tufan said...

You put, Hans, and your co bloggers a set of interestin articles here.
Regarding Turkish journalists: I agree, they are highly underpaid, not allowed to write freely, and often 'choosen' to write the nice stories you mentioned. The Turkish soul is damaged enough, but you are right, only an open discussion can solve problems. Not the current kemalist terminology.
Cheers

tara said...

It was in the seventies that I met a Turkish journalist, who, besides his good manners, could speak English on a cohempresive level.
Sad, but true..

Cem said...

Do I have to trust a Turkish journalist to tell my story, my heritage?
No, no, and no!

Gunther said...

This whole affair is receivd here with disbelief. I am sure that some reactionair journalists are happy with this event. They only forget that the Turkish economy is at stake. The EU proces? More reason for the EU to stop it.