Friday, March 11, 2011

Day Opening March 11



The shaft-Casa Batlló, Barcelona - Spain. By Trey Ratcliff

Thursday, March 10, 2011

Random deviations or Belated Woman's Day wishes...

We find our safeguard in our little joys and achievements. Over the past few months so many little-nothings have made my life worthwhile. It may not be much, it may not matter to others, but my hours of doing small things, that may, on a more specific level be bracketted into "nothing", have given me immense satisfaction.
March 8 was International Woman's Day. I regret missing out posting something special on that day. But then, isn't every day a celebration for us, men and women alike? I do not understand feminism. Feminists, so to say, cannot function without the support and honour of men. In fact, no one can. The good needs bad, the black needs white, the sweet relies on sour... And man needs woman. Ditto the opposite. Remember Yin-Yang? :)
So this Woman's Day, I sat back and thought a little more than usual. I came to the conclusion that I must honour March 8 to recognise and celebrate the men in my life who have made me the woman I am. My father, my grandfather, brother, friends... Even spare gratitude for those who have been mean. For without chauvinists, how would I learn to value those men who care, respect and honour?
Here's cheers to the celebration of humankind, and not just women...

Day Opening March 10


Tuesday, March 8, 2011

Compliments and the Netherlands

"Oh, I’ve had it for ages" or "I got it in a sale" - classic reactions from a Dutch person should they get a pleasant remark about something they’re wearing. The Dutch and compliments are an uneasy match. National Compliments Day - last week, March 1st - aims to change all that.
Hans Poortvliet knows how difficult it is for the Dutch to encourage each other:
"It’s easier for the Dutch to criticise each other than to give each other compliments. It’s not one of our national traits. It’s to do with our Calvinistic nature. There’s nothing wrong with it, except that it’s good to appreciate others. But it doesn’t come naturally to us."

Part of the job
Hans Poortvliet: "Our Calvinistic restraint ensures that we’re sparing with compliments - though daily life
would be more enjoyable if we’d give them more often. ‘You’ve done well’ is rarely heard. And when it is, all too often the reaction is ‘it's just part of my job’."
By contrast, Americans are the complete opposite, says a n US expat, Robert Chesal:

"In the Netherlands you only hear comments when you make a mistake. And if you hear nothing, you take it that everything’s fine. But you don’t get a compliment for it. That’s the way things are here. In America it’s quite different, people are much more generous about complimenting each other."
Self-confident people
Robert Chesal has lived in the Netherlands for nearly 25 years. In that time he hasn't come to have serious doubts about himself, but he has had to get used to the lack of praise here:
"Because we give and receive so many compliments in America, Americans are a confident people.
I felt I could do things reasonably well, so I was not dependent on compliments. I’ve had compliments all my life in America. It took some time before I realised they weren’t given in the Netherlands."
Hans Poortvliet says managers of Dutch businesses would do well to appreciate their employees more, by rewarding them with appreciation and compliments. Especially in these days of an ageing population and consequent likely reduction of the labour force. "Employees love being recognised for their input. The main reason they start losing interest in their job is a lack of appreciation," says Mr Poortvliet, who is a manager himself.
Disturbance
Dutch society seems to have a blind spot when it comes to the way people treat each other. "There is a constant need to be self-confident, but very little drive to value each other," is what sociologist Paul Schnabel told on the subject of the evident lack of courtesy in the Netherlands. He sees a possible solution in the Dutch taking it upon themselves to become more considerate and obliging towards each other. "It sounds banal, but that’s what it’s all about."
Compliments Day
In an attempt to curb Dutch boorishness Hans Poortvliet was the moving force behind National Compliments day on 1st March (now in it’s 9th year) which has as its motto ‘momentje voor een complimentje’ (a little time for a compliment) and 'waardeer en krijg meer' (appreciate and accumulate).
-Hans A.H.C De Wit

March 8


Saturday, March 5, 2011

Pakistan: Where terrorism reigns and ruins

An integral part of moderate Pakistan was silenced with the murder of the 42-year old minority affairs minister Shahbaz Bhatti Thursday morning.
Bhatti's niece Mariam had just closed the gate to the house and Bhatti’s driver was about to drive to the Minister’s office when a small white car blocked the way. According to Bhatti’s, nephew, Robinson George, three gunmen emerged, ran to Bhatti's car and started shooting into the rear passenger seat from different sides. The gunmen then fled and Mariam ran to the car to find her uncle severely injured. The rear windscreen and side panes of the vehicle were smashed. The driver rushed Bhatti to a nearby hospital, but he was declared dead on arrival.
The Punjabi Taliban
The attackers left pamphlets behind signed as ‘Tanzim Al Qaida Tehrik Taliban Punjab’, known to be an al Qaida supported Punjabi Taliban movement. The pamphlets stated that Bhatti had been punished for being a blasphemer – probably because of Bhatti’s long-time efforts to change Pakistan’s draconian blasphemy law. Critics of the blasphemy law say that instead of protecting religious feelings, the law is being used to settle personal scores.
Bhatti, the only Christian in the Pakistani government, became an activist for the rights of minorities when he was still a college student according to family members. After assuming the first federal ministerial post for minorities in Pakistan in 2008 he had set himself a few goals he said. One of them was changing the blasphemy law: “We are reviewing all the laws which create anarchy, an inferiority complex and a sense of discrimination”, he said in his typically soft-spoken voice.

Silence through terror
His ideals and belief were severely put to the test in recent years. In 2010 a Christian woman, Asia Noreen, was sentenced to death for blasphemy – though evidence points to the charges arising from nothing more than a small argument her village. Then in January of this year, Salman Taseer, Governor of Punjab, was killed by his own security guard for taking. The guard, Malik Mumtaz Qadri claimed that he’d killed a blasphemer because Taseer was championing Asia Bibi’s case and speaking out for the abolition of the blasphemy law. Qadri was hailed as a hero, and showered with flower petals when he went to court to face murder charges. Pakistan’s extremist right had so cowered the government that no high ranking figure attended Taseer’s funeral. The few parliamentarians, like Bhatti and his colleague ex information minister Sherry Rehman, who had proposed reforms were left in the cold. And any public or political debate about the bill have halted.
Many religious leaders, tribal elders and others have also been killed for their moderate believes – and the subsequent silence has blatantly eaten away the public space of Pakistan’s moderates and given it to the extremists.
There are consequences at every level. Two men outside the home of Bhatti’s mother say they saw the attackers and the car speeding away, but remain silent witnesses. “I saw them speeding away, I saw everything, but when the police asks us we say that we haven’t seen anything. The Taliban can kill me too.”
One small spark of hope may be the dozens and sometimes hundreds of people who publicly give voice to their moderate ideals. A vigil in front of a bookshop in Islamabad hardly drew just 20 demonstrators, but they were standing there. They demanded exemplary punishments for the killers of Taseer and Bhatti and measures that discourage extremists to commit more murders. One banner said it all: ‘Stop this madness’.
-Hans A.H.C De Wit

Day Opening March 5

Friday, March 4, 2011

Blogger becomes latest victim of Turkish Internet bans

A spat over rights to broadcast Turkish football matches has led a local court to issue a blanket ban on the popular blogging platform Blogger, angering Turkish Internet users with what experts said was a disproportionate response.

The court in the southeastern province of Diyarbakır banned the website, a property of Google Inc., in response to a complaint by the satellite television provider Digiturk, which owns the broadcast rights to Turkish Super League games. Matches broadcast on Digiturk’s Lig TV channel had been illegally posted by several Blogger users on their blogs.

“This is a disproportionate response by the court and undoubtedly has a huge impact on all law-abiding citizens,” cyber-rights activist Yaman Akdeniz told the Hürriyet Daily News & Economic Review on Wednesday, adding that millions of Turkish bloggers and blog readers would be affected by the Diyarbakır court decision.

“[I understand] there is a legitimate concern [regarding Digiturk’s commercial rights] but banning all these websites will not solve the issue. The decision opens the way to collateral damage,” said Akdeniz, who is also a law professor at Istanbul Bilgi University.

There are more than 600,000 Turkish bloggers actively using Blogger and some 18 million users from Turkey visited pages hosted by the site last month, Akdeniz said. The ban is expected to fully go into effect within a few days unless it is successfully challenged in court.

“If two people plan a criminal activity on the phone, should we ban the use of telephones all over the country?” asked Deniz Ergürel, the secretary-general of the Media Association.

“We believe this is a wrong approach to the issue and deprives millions of bloggers and Internet users from writing and sharing ideas online,” Ergürel, who is also a regular blogger, told the Daily News on Wednesday. He added that while the violation of Digiturk’s commercial rights should not be ignored, other solutions had to be found. “Even cursing, threatening or cheating over the phone is considered a crime, but this does not imply access to phones all over the country would be banned if there is a case against them,” he said.

In a press release Wednesday, Digiturk said illegal broadcasts of the league games had not stopped despite many warnings about the issue.

“Digiturk has spent $321 million in order to get the right to broadcast Spor Toto Super League matches. However, matches [whose broadcasting rights] belong to Digiturk and Lig TV are broadcasted by certain websites, disregarding all relevant laws,” the company said in its statement. “Thus, we applied to court to ban these websites, and the court decided to ban access to them, after it was proved that although all legal procedures were conducted, the violations were not stopped.”

Bloggers and their readers reacted angrily and quickly to the court decision, with nearly 9,000 users of the social-networking website Facebook joining a group called “Do not touch my blog” in less than two days after the decision was announced. Similar campaigns have also been created on other websites, such as Twitter.

“I can understand that a company tries to protect its rights when they are violated. But I cannot make sense of the banning of all blogs for content illegally used on only a few blogs,” regular blogger Gülşen Çetin, 24, told the Daily News on Wednesday. “The company that is involved says it couldn’t handle the issue with Google. Of course, everybody is responsible for their own claims, but this is not an excuse for them to cause such a big censorship event.”

Read the complete article by ERISA DAUTAJ ŞENERDEM here

Day Opening March 4

Wednesday, March 2, 2011

Day Opening - March 2



Today is the day that the Dutch vote for the Provincial representatives. Indirectly the members of the Dutch Senate will be elected. Long queues are to be expected...

Monday, February 28, 2011

What can the ICC do regarding Libya/Gaddafi?

While Muammar Gaddafi’s mercenaries and militias wreak havoc in Libya, legal experts look on from the sidelines. The bloodshed has been condemned in the strongest terms: there is talk of “crimes against humanity” and even “genocide”. But if the dictatorship crumbles, will justice be done? And will the case come before the International Criminal Court?
Muammar Gaddafi is doing everything in his power to stop the Libyan revolution in its tracks. He has rejected dialogue in favour of brute force. The international community has condemned the violence in no uncertain terms. On Wednesday UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon spoke of serious violations of international law and human rights in Libya. The UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, Navi Pillay, called on Tuesday for an independent international investigation, condemning the "callousness with which Libyan authorities and their hired guns are reportedly shooting live rounds of ammunition at peaceful protesters".
Dr Pillay, a former judge at the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague, says such actions could constitute crimes against humanity. But the ICC’s current chief prosecutor Luis Moreno Ocampo says his hands are tied. This week he announced that the solution lies first and foremost in the hands of Libya; the ICC can only serve as a legal last resort.

New regime

The ICC can only intervene if Libya refuses or is unable to carry out its own investigation into the crimes. Until such times, Mr Ocampo can only wait on the sidelines. If Gaddafi is toppled, a new regime may want to bring him to justice before a Libyan court. Ocampo will only be able to act if Libya’s new leaders are unwilling or unable to take such steps.
But that scenario is still a long way off. This week Gaddafi declared that he would fight on until the last bullet. Mr Ocampo is bound by the Rome Statute, the 1998 treaty that led to the founding of the ICC. Gaddafi’s regime is not a signatory to the treaty and has therefore banished the prosecutor to the sidelines for the time being.
Yet there is still a chance that the ICC may come into action. First of all, the UN Security Council might instruct Mr Ocampo to carry out investigations in Libya. However, the Security Council is very much divided on the ICC. So far the UN has only asked Mr Ocampo to conduct investigations in the troubled Sudanese region of Darfur.
The other option lies in Tripoli itself. It is extremely unlikely that Gaddafi would ever accept the jurisdiction of the ICC, but a new Libyan regime might. The ball remains in Libya’s court: Ocampo will have to wait and see whether a new Libyan leadership will invite him to investigate the current political violence.
If the ICC takes on the case, it will focus on investigating whether crimes against humanity have been committed. Any crimes committed by Gaddafi before July 2002 will be beyond the court’s jurisdiction.


The International Criminal Court


•The International Criminal Court has been based in the Dutch city of The Hague since July 2002.
•The prosecutor, Luis Moreno Ocampo, can only prosecute people suspected of war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide committed after 1 July 2002.
•There are 114 signatories to the Rome Statute.

•Five suspects are currently being held at the UN detention facility in Scheveningen. Trials are ongoing against:
•Lubanga (DR Congo)
-Katanga & Ngudjolo Chui (DR Congo)
•Bemba (Central African Republic)

•The court' s most wanted suspects are:
•Omar al Bashir (Sudan) for war crimes and genocide
•Joseph Kony (Uganda) for war crimes committed by the LRA rebel group