Tuesday, July 20, 2010

'Boomerang kids'

A social reportin the Netherlands covers the growing number of young people who return to live with their parents after leaving home. In the 1990s, just 15 percent of young adults returned to the nest. Between 2000 and 2007, a whopping one in five young women moved back in with their parents. Which is pretty normal in Turkey, where most of the young women move in with their parents after completing their studies.

In this Dutch report it says that compared to other European countries, the Dutch welfare state makes it relatively easy to build up a life as an independent young person in the Netherlands. Why then, it asks, do these 'boomerang children' return home?
A sociologist points out that many come back home after the break-up of a relationship. The lack of affordable housing in many big cities compounds the problem. It is also said that many young people move to a different part of the country when they leave home and that homesickness can play a part in deciding to return to their roots.
However maybe 22-year-old Lisanne can fill us in on the real reason. "Before I came home, I told my mother: 'I'll do my own washing and ironing, you don't need to bother with it.' But, she still does it all - washing, cooking, cleaning. It's just like a hotel," she admits. And that's a little different than in countries such as Turkey and Italy where the baby/child is still King or Queen!

Day Opening - July 20

A mountain called Zimba, Austria