Monday, March 30, 2009

Twitter in crisis situations

During the immediate aftermath of the controlled landing of US Airways flight 1549 into New York’s Hudson River, Twitter really came into its own. By 4:16pm ET there were already hundreds of messages posted about the crash. Ten minutes later, links were being shared to photos taken by eyewitnesses, including the definitive image of the crisis taken by a ferry commuter that was posted at 3.47pm, just minutes after the incident. By contrast, there was no dedicated online crisis response channel from US Airways until around 5.00pm. The same happened when a Turkish Airline plane crashed in Amsterdam earlier this year.

Had the company been monitoring Twitter for brand mentions, they could have set up a dedicated feed and been responding to the conversation for at least 45 minutes before their own response site was in place. They could have even prepared for the eventuality by defining keywords and bots to follow/respond with important information well in advance of any crisis hitting.
As the communications environment in which we operate becomes even quicker and the expectations of consumers from those involved increases, Twitter is certainly going to be a key communication channel in times of crisis and there is absolute no reason why companies can’t – and shouldn’t – be incorporating it into their crisis response plans. Voila!

Busy in the antartica...


...and he was not breaking the ice...

Day opening - March 30


Like in the old Turkish movies, the wedding of my cousin...
Photo taken by Belgin Zeytin